China’s Conundrum With Refugees

Originally posted at: N.E.A.T. (동북아경[NorthEast Asian Tantra)
http://blogs.cfr.org/asia/2012/10/16/the-underground-railroad-from-north-korea-to-freedom


Kim Han-mi watches her mother being dragged by Chinese policemen when her family attempted to enter into the Japanese Consulate in order to seek asylum in Shenyang. (Kyodo/courtesy Reuters)

I’m not a big fan of the “Save My Friend” crowds that have protested against the Chinese government. Is it wrong for them to send away North Korean refugees back to North Korea? Legally, no. Morally, if they were bound to the North Korean people, yes. The problem is that they are not bound to protect North Korean citizens, only their own –even then, they’re struggling hard to do that. The real question is, why aren’t the Chinese citizens involved? As with the picture above, that refugee could have used the help of a Chinese mob storming into the Japanese Embassy. That’s simple. Even Batman is having a hard enough time fighting against the Chinese government, let alone the Chinese citizens who’re losing their houses.
So what has the international community proposed aside from suggestions that the government break their own laws, or only enforce them partially?

Admittedly, China loses the moral high ground when it allows its citizens to charge into the Japanese embassy, yet puts in so much effort to prevent refugees from entering the Japanese embassy. International community: Are you happy now?

阿江

本人現任爲龔家令道製作主筆。關心東亞美洲兩地政治。
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